THE FEMINIST WELL-BEING PODCAST

It’s Beyond the Food Podcast

Join well-being expert Stephanie Dodier as she guides on how to feel damn good by reshaping your mind instead of your body. Let’s go beyond the food and fight diet culture & patriarchy by living powerfully. Through solo episodes and special guest interviews, you’ll walk away with ressources to embrace your well-being & health in a way that will expand your freedom and power. 

Subscribe to our podcast on your favorite podcast platform.

THE WELL-BEING FEMINIST PODCAST

It’s Beyond the Food Podcast

Join well-being expert Stephanie Dodier as she guides on how to feel damn good by reshaping your mind instead of your body. Let’s go beyond the food and fight diet culture & patriarchy by living powerfully. Through solo episodes and special guest interviews, you’ll walk away with ressources to embrace your well-being & health in a way that will expand your freedom and power. 

Subscribe to our podcast on your favorite podcast platform.

Our Most Recent Episodes

395-How to Hack Your Time with Vikki Yaffe

395-How to Hack Your Time with Vikki Yaffe

How to Hack Your Time

How to Hack Your Time: Unlearning Time Management Myths

Are you constantly feeling like there aren’t enough hours in the day? Do you struggle with managing your time effectively? Many of us have been taught myths about time management that leave us feeling overwhelmed and unproductive.

In this episode of the Beyond the Food podcast, I sat down with Vikki Yaffe, a time-hacking expert. We discussed how to unlearn these damaging time myths and embrace a more empowering approach to time management.

The Discriminatory Nature of Time Management

We started our conversation by highlighting a profound truth: time itself doesn’t discriminate, but the way we’re taught to manage it does. She pointed out that current time management norms and structures ignore the needs of:

– Women (who operate on different cycles than men)
– Neurodivergent individuals
– People with chronic illnesses
– Parents
– Creative professionals

This oversight leads to frustration and a sense of failure when traditional time management tools don’t work for us.

How to Hack Your Time: Debunking the “Not Enough Time” Myth

One of the most common complaints I hear from women is, “I just don’t have enough time.” Vikki’s response? “Absolutely! You’ve got too much to do and not enough time.”

But here’s the kicker: acknowledging this truth is just the first step. The real magic happens when we start making intentional choices about our time.

Vikki suggests:

1. Deleting 50% of tasks (you’ll likely still achieve the same results)
2. Doing some things “less good” or “less perfect”
3. Getting clear on what truly matters

She introduced a powerful question: “What do I want to be an example of for the next generation?” This perspective shift can help us prioritize self-care and make better choices.

Time Hacking: It’s All About Your Brain

Vikki’s approach to time management, which she calls “time hacking,” focuses on the root cause of our time struggles: our brain. She argues that traditional time management tools themselves can be a waste of time if they don’t address how our brains work.

Some examples of brain-based time wasters include:

– Rewriting to-do lists multiple times
– Over-planning without action
– Perfecting plans instead of executing them

Time Hacking Strategies

So, how can we start hacking our time? Vikki shared several strategies:

1. Understand your brain loves wasting time (it’s trying to conserve energy)
2. Recognize that “I don’t have enough time” is just a thought (and a harmful one)
3. Set deadlines that work for you (things take as long as you let them)
4. Give yourself excess time instead of rushing

The key is to develop a kinder, more playful relationship with time. Stop being so serious and rigid about it!

Hustle Culture: The Cousin of Diet Culture

As someone who’s spent years fighting diet culture, I was struck by the parallels Vikki drew between time management and dieting. Both industries thrive on making us feel inadequate.

Just as there are thousands of diet plans, there are countless time management tools. If any of them truly worked, we’d all use the same one!

Vikki defines “hustle” as doing things to change a belief about ourselves. Sound familiar? It’s like trying to lose weight to feel worthy. But true change comes from addressing the root cause – our thoughts and beliefs.

Learning to Invest Your Time

One of my favorite concepts from our conversation was viewing time as an investment. Vikki, with her background in financial investing, has developed a framework around “time debt” and “time investing.”

The idea is simple yet profound: what we do today can set us up for success (or failure) tomorrow. By connecting with our future selves, we make better decisions in the present.

Vikki the founder & CEO of Time Hackers, used to think “being disorganised” was a personality trait. She’s on a mission to take on the entire time management industry and help people achieve more, faster, while being kind to themselves along the way.

What you’ll learn listening to this podcast episode on how to hack your time:

• Why traditional time management tools often fail and what to do instead.
• How to identify and overcome your brain’s time-wasting tactics.
• Strategies for investing your time wisely to achieve more by doing less.
• The surprising connection between hustle culture and diet culture.

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

Work With Me

Connect with our Guest:

Website – Vikki Yaffe

Instagram – Vikki Yaffe

 

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394-How I Coach Self-Sabotage

394-How I Coach Self-Sabotage

How I coach self-sabotage

 

How I Coach Self-Sabotage: A Fresh Perspective on Personal Growth

Are you tired of feeling stuck, despite your best efforts to move forward? You’re not alone. As a non-diet nutritionist and certified coach with a Ph.D. in diet culture (yes, you read that right!), I’ve spent years unraveling the mystery of self-sabotage.

In this podcast episode, I’ll share my unique approach to coaching self-sabotage, helping you break free from old patterns and create lasting change.

Redefining Self-Sabotage: It’s Not What You Think

Self-sabotage is commonly defined as actions (or inactions) that prevent us from achieving our goals. But here’s where my perspective diverges from the norm.

Self-Sabotage: A Coping Mechanism, Not a Character Flaw

The internet often labels self-sabotage as a weakness, a lack of discipline, or insufficient willpower. I disagree. My years of experience and study in psychology reveal a different truth: people self-sabotage because they don’t feel safe.

This safety issue can be emotional, mental, or physical, operating on both conscious and unconscious levels. It’s not about your worth or intelligence; it’s about protection.

The Hidden Forces Behind Self-Sabotage

Unconscious Triggers: Past Traumas and Family Dynamics

Unconscious reasons for self-sabotage often trace back to our past. Consider my own experience: being publicly weighed at Weight Watchers at age 12. That’s not just embarrassing; it’s traumatic.

Other triggers can include family upbringing, bullying experiences, or deeply ingrained belief systems.

Conscious Choices: Creating Safety in Uncomfortable Situations

Sometimes, we’re fully aware of why we’re self-sabotaging. Years ago, I avoided my CrossFit gym because I knew what awaited me: yelling coaches and judgmental partners. My “self-sabotage” was a conscious choice to avoid rejection and stress.

The Diet Culture Connection: When Your Body Feels Threatened

Diet culture is a prime example of how self-sabotage serves as a safety mechanism. When we restrict food, our body interprets it as a threat. “Danger! We’re starving!” it screams.

Our innate fight-or-flight response kicks in, overriding willpower. That’s why diets don’t work—they try to bypass our most basic survival instincts.

My Approach: Cognitive Behavior Coaching

While traditional health coaching relies on accountability and discipline, I use cognitive behavior coaching, a science-based method that truly understands human behavior.

Step 1: Reframe Self-Sabotage

We start by redefining self-sabotage as a smart coping mechanism. You’re not broken; you’re trying to feel safe. Actions like procrastination or perfectionism are neutral—they say nothing about your worth.

Step 2: Investigate Root Causes

Next, we dig into why you’re behaving this way. I ask clients to write down all their thoughts about a specific goal, like exercise. What have you learned about it? How does it make you feel?

Often, we uncover feelings of anxiety, depression, or shame—the real culprits behind self-sabotage.

Step 3: Process Emotions

The hardest part? Sitting with these emotions. Our society offers endless distractions—phones, Netflix—to avoid feelings. But processing emotions is key to accessing safety.

Step 4: Choose New Thoughts

Here’s a game-changer: you can choose what you think. When I learned this, it was a “holy shit” moment. Those unsafe thoughts leading to self-sabotage? You can change them.

Step 5: Take Small Steps

Finally, we use techniques like “minimum baseline” to reintroduce feared activities in small bites. If exercise feels unsafe, it might take months to feel comfortable at a gym again—and that’s okay.

Self-Sabotage: Your Body’s Wisdom

I believe self-sabotage is your body’s innate wisdom signaling a need for change. It’s urging you to either leave an unsafe situation or transform your thoughts about it.

Consider my journey with fatphobia. As a fat woman, I can’t escape it—unless I diet again, which I tried for 25 years. No thanks! So, I’m changing my thoughts, as I shared in my recent podcast episode.

Be Patient, Be Kind

Changing self-sabotage behavior takes time, especially if you’ve been battling diet culture. If you’re cycling on and off a behavior, you’re likely not addressing self-sabotage safely.

But there’s hope. By reframing self-sabotage as a call for safety, not a personal failing, you can make lasting changes. It’s a journey of patience and self-compassion.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode:

  • Why self-sabotage isn’t a sign of weakness, but a cry for safety
  • How diet culture and perfectionism fuel self-sabotaging behaviors
  • Practical steps to reframe self-sabotage and foster personal growth

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

Work With Me

 

read more
393-Work-Life Balance Is a Scam with Unyime Oguta

393-Work-Life Balance Is a Scam with Unyime Oguta

Work-Life Balance Is a Scam with Unyime Oguta

Work-Life Balance Is a Scam: Unyime Oguta’s Perspective on Self-ish Motherhood

Have you ever felt like you’re constantly juggling work and family, trying to achieve that elusive work-life balance? In this episode of the It’s Beyond The Food podcast, I sat down with Unyime, a life coach for working moms, who boldly claims: work-life balance is a scam.

Unyime’s Take on the Work-Life Balance Myth

During our conversation, Unyime posed a thought-provoking question: “Is it even normal for a woman to work full-time and have kids?” In her opinion, it’s not. She argues that when we have young children, we’re technically meant to be with them all the time. Now we’re layering 40 more hours in a week. It’s just not normal.

So, why do we chase this elusive work-life balance? Unyime explains it’s because we’re taught to believe that being a “good mom” means doing it all, having it all, and being totally balanced. But she asserts: it’s not possible.

The Power of Being Self-ish

When I asked Unyime about this concept, she clarified, “I’m not telling you to be selfish. I’m telling you to be ‘self-ish’ – putting yourself first.” She explains it’s about coming back to self, not in an idolatrous way, but recognizing that you’re human with a spirit in this body.

Unyime asserts, “Making peace with being self-ish is realizing that your peace depends on it.” She advises women to ask themselves, “How is this showing up in my peace?” or “How is this impacting my peace?”. When we do this, she says, we can never go wrong.

Breaking Intergenerational Trauma

Unyime’s perspective isn’t just about individual well-being. She sees embracing self-ish motherhood as a way to break cycles. Just as we’re working to break the intergenerational trauma of dieting, she believes we can do the same with the “good mother” syndrome.

As a mother of three daughters, Unyime sees this as her mission. By modeling self-ish behavior, she’s showing her girls they have permission to prioritize themselves. She muses, “Imagine if all women just woke up and decided they’re okay with how they’re raising their kids. A lot of the self-help books on parenting wouldn’t exist!”

Redefining Self-Care

When discussing being self-ish, we couldn’t avoid the topic of self-care. Unyime believes that in today’s environment, our approach to self-care is somewhat toxic. It’s often seen as an activity – a bubble bath, a pedicure – rather than a relationship with yourself.

She argues that self-care isn’t just about soothing yourself to get back on the wheel. It’s about solving issues at the root, asking: “Am I worthy of rest? How am I feeling about myself?” Once that’s grounded, she says, the pedicures become something you do because you want to, not as a coping mechanism.

High Maintenance Baseline

One concept that truly resonated was Unyime’s idea of having a high-maintenance baseline. She clarifies this isn’t about being snotty; it’s about setting high standards for what makes you feel well-cared for.

She gave personal examples: she has a high maintenance standard for eating, refusing to eat her kids’ leftovers. In communication, she’s respectful, honoring, and open to learning. These are her standards.

Unyime believes when you have a high maintenance baseline, it invites others to step up. It’s about raising each other up. “When you rise, and I rise,” she says, “we have the power to keep pulling everybody else up with us.”

Conclusion: Crafting Your Own Path

Unyime sees the whole adage of “having it all” as very patriarchal. It’s not about having what you want; it’s about having what people want you to have. That’s when you get into trouble. Instead, she encourages women to craft what makes them feel good.

She believes women have the wisdom to want to craft what makes them feel good, not to dominate others. That’s the biggest difference between matriarchy and patriarchy – matriarchy is about moving as a collective. It’s not just about us; it’s about transforming generations.

Unyime Oguta is a Life Strategist, Coach, and Speaker for women who is passionate about redefining what it means for women, especially working moms to ‘have it all’ in motherhood, career, and life. As a working mom of 3, and through her personal recovery experience from burnout to thriving, she now supports women in creating lives where success doesn’t have to cost them their peace, well-being, or presence with loved ones.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode:

  • Why work-life balance is an unrealistic expectation for working moms
  • How to make peace with being “self-ish” in motherhood
  • Why your baseline should be high maintenance

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

Work With Me

Connect with our Guest:

Website – Unyime

Instagram – Unyime

 

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392-Fatphobia: How I Handle It

392-Fatphobia: How I Handle It

Fatphobia: How I Handle It

Fatphobia: How I Handle It

In this powerful episode of the Feminist Wellbeing Podcast-It’s Beyond The Food, I share my personal journey with fatphobia and weight discrimination.

My Encounter with Fatphobia Began at 12

The Roots of Weight Stigma

At just 12 years old, I was directed to Weight Watchers by an adult. This marked the beginning of my experience with weight discrimination. I was shamed publicly for not losing weight at such a young age. Being ridiculed and singled out for my body size as a child was extremely damaging.

Living in Two Worlds: Dieting and Fatphobia

The Cycle of Weight Loss and Regain

Throughout my 20s and 30s, I lived in two worlds – dieting and weight regain. During periods of weight loss, I experienced temporary reprieve from fatphobia. Society treated me better when I was in a smaller body. But once I regained the weight, the harsh judgment and discrimination resurfaced. This cycle was mentally and emotionally exhausting.

The Toll of Internalized Oppression

Compliance as a Coping Mechanism

To protect myself from rejection, I adopted coping mechanisms like overworking and people-pleasing. I became the perfect employee and excelled academically to offset being judged for my size. This internalized oppression and constant need to compensate took a severe mental and emotional toll, eventually leading to burnout in my early 40s.

My Transformation: From Compliance to Body Liberation

Step 1: Setting Boundaries
The first step in my journey was setting firm boundaries. I avoided situations that could trigger weight stigma to give myself a much-needed mental and emotional break. This meant declining travel to avoid being mistreated on airplanes.

Step 2: Seeking Professional Help
Next, I invested in coaching to build the mental and emotional capacity to deal with fatphobia healthily. This additional cost and labor highlights an unfortunate reality – fat people must often pay more for services to be treated with basic human dignity.

Step 3: No More Compliance for Safety
Instead of complying to feel safe, I learned to create safety for myself through self-compassion and nervous system regulation techniques like breathing exercises.

Step 4: Changing Thoughts and Beliefs
With a solid foundation, I could change my thoughts about fatphobia’s impact on my life. I acknowledged its existence in society but decided how much power it would have over my personal experience.

Fatphobia: How I Handle It – Living Powerfully

Setting Boundaries with Healthcare Providers
Today, I proactively set boundaries with new healthcare providers to ensure respectful treatment. Before my first appointment, I outline my needs on paper. If the provider cannot comply, I leave and find a better fit. While frustrating, this extra labor allows me to access quality care.

Using My Fatness as a Catalyst for Change
I now use my fatness to provoke conversations and get hired for speaking engagements centered on body liberation. But this was only possible after the hard work of healing internalized fatphobia. I’m able to make a powerful impact by showing up wholly and visibly in my fat body.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode on fatphobia-how I handle it:

  • The harsh realities of weight stigma in society
  • How I overcame internalized fat-shaming
  • Practical steps to deal with fatphobia powerfully

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

Work With Me

 

read more
391-How to Overcome Binge Eating with Stefanie and Sarah of Life After Diets Podcast

391-How to Overcome Binge Eating with Stefanie and Sarah of Life After Diets Podcast

How to overcome binge eating

How to Overcome Binge Eating

Have you ever felt trapped in a cycle of binge eating? If so, you’re not alone. In this powerful episode, Stefanie and Sarah from the “Life After Diets Podcast” join me for a candid conversation about overcoming compulsive eating.

What Is Compulsive Eating?

We kick off by defining the difference between compulsive and impulsive eating. While impulsive eating is mindless snacking without forethought, compulsive eating feels like a loss of control – a behavior driven by forces beyond our conscious will.

How to Overcome Binge Eating: The Nervous System’s Role

Stefanie eloquently explains how our nervous system plays a crucial role in both creating and healing binge eating. When we restrict our food intake, our body perceives it as a threat and increases hunger signals to restore balance.

However, our conscious mind often rejects these signals, leading to an internal conflict. This clash between our body’s needs and our desire for control can fuel a compulsive eating cycle fueled by shame and self-criticism.

The Importance of Self-Compassion

Sarah emphasizes the importance of self-compassion in recovery. Shame corrodes our belief in our ability to change, making it harder to break free from compulsive patterns. By connecting with others who understand this struggle, we can cultivate self-compassion and emotional resilience.

How to Overcome Binge Eating: The Power of Support

Both Stefanie and Sarah stress the value of support in overcoming binge eating. Whether through one-on-one coaching, group therapy, or online communities, having someone to hold our hand through the recovery journey can make all the difference.

Stefanie’s coaching practice, for instance, offers daily WhatsApp check-ins to provide consistent, safe support – a lifeline for those navigating the challenges of compulsive eating day by day.

The Path to Recovery

Ultimately, the path to recovery isn’t about stopping binge eating but addressing the underlying needs and traumas that fuel the compulsion. As Sarah notes, trying to stop binge eating by solely focusing on stopping often backfires.

Instead, we must shift our attention to creating safety, self-acceptance, and a life less compatible with compulsive patterns. This process may involve therapy, somatic work, or simply learning to hold ourselves with fierce compassion, as Stephanie beautifully describes.

A Powerful Reminder

This conversation is a powerful reminder that binge eating isn’t a personal failing but a complex interplay of biology, psychology, and social conditioning. By understanding the nervous system’s role, cultivating self-compassion, and leaning on support, we can break free from the shame and isolation that often perpetuate compulsive patterns.

If you’re struggling with binge eating, know that you’re not alone – and that healing is possible. Take the first step today by seeking out the resources and support that resonate with you.

Sarah and Stefanie are co-hosts of Life After Diets, a podcast focused on personal stories exploring the nuances of eating disorder recovery and body image issues. Stefanie is a Recovery Coach and Somatic-Therapist-in-training based in the US, while Sarah is a therapist specializing in binge eating recovery based in the UK.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode:

  • The difference between compulsive and impulsive eating
  • The role of the nervous system in creating and healing binge eating
  • The importance of self-compassion and support in recovery

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

Work With Me

Connect with our Guest:

Website – Stefanie and Sarah

Instagram – Stefanie and Sarah

Facebook – Stefanie and Sarah

 

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390-Your Brain On Patriarchy

390-Your Brain On Patriarchy

Your brain on patriarchy


Your Brain on Patriarchy: How the Patriarchal Mindset Impacts Women’s Well-Being

As a woman, have you ever felt guilty for putting your needs first? Or perhaps you’ve struggled with speaking up and taking up space in professional settings? If so, you’re not alone. In this eye-opening episode of the Feminist Well-Being Podcast, I dive deep into the ways patriarchal beliefs shape our minds and impact our overall well-being.

Your Brain on Patriarchy: Unpacking the Socialization Process

Right from a young age, girls are socialized to embody the “good girl” archetype – to be polite, modest, and compliant. We’re taught to prioritize others’ needs over our own and avoid challenging the status quo. This socialization process, deeply rooted in patriarchal beliefs, shapes our neural pathways and conditions our thoughts, emotions, and behaviors.

The Emotional Toll of Patriarchal Conditioning

When we suppress our true selves to conform to societal expectations, it takes a heavy emotional toll. We might feel guilty for investing in ourselves, resentful for constantly putting others first, or anxious about speaking our minds. These unprocessed emotions can eventually manifest as mental health issues like depression or panic attacks.

Reclaiming Your Power: Rewiring Your Brain

The good news? Our brains have an incredible ability called neuroplasticity, which allows us to rewire our neural pathways and adopt new belief systems. Through practices like cognitive-behavioral coaching (also known as thought work), we can actively challenge and replace patriarchal beliefs with empowering ones.

For instance, instead of tying your worth to your body size or appearance, you can rewire your brain to believe that your body is a tool for experiencing life – nothing more, nothing less. This process takes time and conscious effort, but the rewards are invaluable: increased self-confidence, emotional resilience, and the freedom to show up as your authentic self.

Next Steps: Embarking on Your Rewiring Journey

If you’re ready to embark on your rewiring journey, I offer several resources to support you:

– The “Beyond Mindset” mentorship program teaches women the cognitive-behavioral coaching techniques for self-coaching.
– The “Undiet Your Life” yearlong program combines mindset work with intuitive eating and body neutrality principles.
– You can also hire a certified non-diet coach from my team for personalized guidance.

Visit the “Work With Me” page on my website to explore these offerings and start your transformation today.

My sisters, you have the power to break free from patriarchal conditioning and reshape your mindset. Join me on this journey of self-discovery, and together, let’s create a world where women can thrive without apology.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode on Your brain on patriarchy:

  • Understand the difference between patriarchy (a system of beliefs) and men
  • Discover how the “good girl” socialization trains women’s brains to be people-pleasers.
  • Gain insights into rewiring your brain to break free from patriarchal conditioning.

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

Work With Me

 

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389-Aging Powerfully with Deb Benfield From Aging Body Liberation

389-Aging Powerfully with Deb Benfield From Aging Body Liberation

Aging Powerfully

As someone in my late 40s, the idea of “aging powerfully” has been on my mind lately. That’s why I was thrilled to have Deb Benfield, the force behind @agingbodyliberation, on the It’s Beyond The Food Podcast to share her wisdom.

Overcoming Internalized Ageism

From an early age, we internalize societal narratives that cast aging in an overwhelmingly negative light. Deb stressed that the first step to aging powerfully is recognizing and overcoming these internalized ageist beliefs that have been imposed on us. Unlearning the idea that getting older is something to fear or resist is crucial for inhabiting our changing bodies with confidence.

The First Step to Aging Powerfully

Deb drove home the point that we all have internalized ageism – preconceived notions about what aging looks and feels like based on the narratives we’ve absorbed since childhood. The first step to aging powerfully, she says, is recognizing that internal bias exists and working to unlearn those limiting beliefs.

Embracing Body Changes

As we age, our bodies naturally change. Deb emphasizes that staying comfortable in your body means accepting – not fighting – those transformations. Rather than treating your body as a “project” to control, see it as your partner through life’s journey.

Dismantling Diet Culture’s Role

One of the key themes Deb emphasized is the need to dismantle diet culture’s influence alongside the anti-aging industry’s agenda. These two forces are intrinsically linked, reinforcing the toxic notion that only thin, youthful bodies have value. Aging powerfully requires rejecting these harmful cultural narratives in favor of true body acceptance at every stage of life.

The Anti-Aging Industry’s Agenda

One of the most powerful parts of the conversation centered on the intersection of diet culture, anti-fat bias, and the anti-aging industry. Deb highlighted how these reinforce the notion that only certain bodies – young, thin, able-bodied – are worthy, fueling unnecessary fear and control around the aging process.

Focusing on True Values

For many, thinness becomes a way to try clinging to societal relevance and belonging as we age. But Deb argues this misses the point entirely. By middle age, our true values have often evolved beyond empty promises of the anti-aging machine. Aging powerfully means refocusing on what really lights you up in this new chapter.

The Path Forward

So how can we age powerfully? According to Deb, it begins with conscious choice – examining our motivations and making empowered decisions free of fear-based narratives. It’s about staying curious, building community, and above all, treating our changing bodies with deep compassion.

As I move into my “wisdom years,” this conversation was an inspiring reminder to let go of limiting beliefs, embrace the beauty of this journey, and show up powerfully at every age.

Deb invites you to blaze a liberating new path to a respectful, nurturing relationship with your aging body. She has helped hundreds of women heal their relationship with food, eating, and their bodies in her 35-year career as a Registered Dietitian and Registered Yoga Teacher specializing in preventing and treating disordered eating. Now in her 60s, she focuses her research, training, passion, clinical, and lived experience on the intersection of pro-aging and body liberation.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode:

  • How to recognize and unlearn the internalized ageism we’ve all been exposed to
  • The importance of dismantling anti-fat bias alongside anti-aging culture
  •  Practical tips for staying comfortable in your changing body as you age

Mentioned in the show:

Health At Every Size Health Sheets

Free Resources and Training

Connect with our Guest:

Website – Deb Benfield

Instagram – Deb Benfield

Facebook – Deb Benfield

 

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388-The #1 Mindset Holding You From Not Giving a F*ck About Your Body Looks

388-The #1 Mindset Holding You From Not Giving a F*ck About Your Body Looks

mindset

Do you constantly worry about how your body looks? Are you fed up with obsessing over your weight, criticizing your appearance in the mirror, and letting society’s beauty standards dictate your self-worth? It’s time for you to break free from this toxic cycle, and the key lies in a powerful mindset shift that I’m going to share with you today.

The Missing Link: Self-Awareness

The number one mindset holding you back from not giving a f*ck about how your body looks is a lack of self-awareness. You becoming truly self-aware – acknowledging and understanding your thoughts, emotions, and behaviors – is the first step towards embracing your body unconditionally.

When you become aware of all parts of you, you realize that you have the power to change how you experience life, how you experience your body,

Socialized Thoughts Are Not Facts

The reason you constantly fixate on your physical appearance is that you’ve been conditioned to believe thoughts like, “As a woman, your purpose in life is to be beautiful,” or “The reason why you’re alone is because of what your body looks like.” I stress that these thoughts are not facts but rather socialized opinions ingrained in your mind by diet culture and patriarchal norms.

Mindset: The Thought Download Exercise

To cultivate self-awareness and challenge these limiting beliefs, I recommend a powerful exercise called a “thought download” to you. This simple yet profound practice involves you grabbing a pen and notebook and allowing your thoughts to flow freely onto the page, without judgment or censorship.

By externalizing your inner dialogue, you can begin to identify the specific thoughts that trigger feelings of shame, guilt, or frustration about your body. From there, you can consciously choose whether you want to continue entertaining those thoughts or replace them with more empowering narratives.

Mindset: Changing Thoughts to Change Reality

When you become aware of what you create, you automatically realize, ‘F*ck, I can change this,’ I assert to you. If you think differently, guess what? You’re going to feel differently, and over time, you’re going to have different behavior towards your body.

This mindset shift is not about you changing your physical appearance but about reshaping your relationship with your mind. By cultivating self-awareness, you can reclaim your power and stop allowing societal pressures to dictate your self-worth.

Mindset: The Transformative Journey Begins

So why not give it a try? Grab a notebook, find a cozy spot, and start downloading your thoughts about your body. You might be surprised at the liberating insights that emerge when you finally acknowledge the narratives playing on repeat in your mind.

The number one mindset shift you can do to not give a f*ck about your body. And really about anything as a woman in a patriarchal society, entrenched in diet culture and fatphobia, is to realize the power that you have to change your reality by changing the way you think.

You can embrace this empowering mindset and watch how your perspective on your body – and life – transforms.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode on mindset:

• How to cultivate self-awareness to stop obsessing about body image
• The thought download exercise to identify limiting beliefs
• The power of changing thoughts to change reality

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

 

 

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387-When Body Positivity Doesn’t Work

387-When Body Positivity Doesn’t Work

When Body Positivity Doesn’t Work

When Body Positivity Doesn’t Work

Body positivity has become a popular movement in recent years, with the goal of helping people feel confident and comfortable in their own skin. However, for many of us, the concept of “body positivity” has fallen short in achieving its intended purpose. In this podcast episode, Brianna and I dive deep into understanding why body positivity doesn’t always work. We explore what can be done instead.

Understanding Body Image

The first step in unpacking this issue is to define what body image truly means. Brianna explains that body image is not just about how we see ourselves in the mirror. Rather, it encompasses four key aspects: perception, affect, cognition, and behavior.

It’s important for me to recognize that body positivity has been co-opted and distorted from its original roots. It started as a social justice movement led by fat, Black, and queer women. The modern interpretation of body positivity has often been reduced to simply “loving the skin you’re in.” This fails to address the deeper, systemic issues at play.

The Limitations of Body Positivity

One of the main reasons why body positivity doesn’t work for me is that it fails to address the core issue: societal pressures and ingrained beliefs that equate our worth with physical appearance. We, as women, have been conditioned by these forces to believe our value comes from how we look. This constant pressure makes true self-acceptance a difficult feat.

Furthermore, the pursuit of body positivity can sometimes be driven by a desire for safety and conformity, not genuine self-acceptance. Brianna eloquently exposes how diet culture has rebranded itself under the guise of “health and wellness,” while still clinging to the harmful narrative that thinness equals worth.

Rebuilding Self-Esteem

If body positivity is not the solution, what is? We move beyond body positivity by emphasizing self-esteem work. Brianna and I champion rebuilding our sense of value and worth outside the limitations of our physical bodies. This requires us to unpack the ingrained beliefs and narratives, and consciously choose a more holistic and empowering definition of our worth.

Motivation also plays a key role in this journey. I differentiate between feeling obligated (“having to”) to do something driven by shame and fear, versus truly desiring (“wanting to”) to do something fueled by self-love and autonomy. This mindset shift is critical for creating lasting, sustainable change.

Embracing the Journey

Ultimately, the work of healing our relationship with our bodies is an ongoing process. As Brianna states, “as long as we have a body, we will have to continue to pull back the layers.” The key is to approach this journey with compassion, patience, and a willingness to explore the deeper emotional and psychological aspects of our self-image.

Brianna (Bri) Campos (she/her), LPC, is a licensed mental health counselor based in New Jersey. As a body image educator and the founder of Body Image With Bri, she’s passionate about all things body image and practices through the lenses of Health at Every Size® and Intuitive Eating. She specializes in body image education including her unique framework on body grief.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode:

  • The true definition and origins of body positivity, and how it has been misinterpreted
  • Why body positivity alone is not an effective solution for healing our relationship with our bodies
  • The importance of rebuilding self-esteem and redefining our worth beyond physical appearance
  • The difference between “having to” and “wanting to” when it comes to self-care and wellness
  • The understanding that body image work is a lifelong journey, requiring ongoing self-exploration and growth

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

Connect with our Guest:

Website – Bri Campos

Instagram – Bri Campos

 

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386-Feminist Well-Being

386-Feminist Well-Being

Feminist Well-Being

Moving Past the Narrow View of Health

In this episode of the It’s Beyond The Food podcast, I’m inviting you on a journey to rethink well-being. I want to show you how to achieve true happiness, purpose, and self-actualization as a woman in today’s world, going beyond the limited focus on physical health.

My Personal Transformation

My own story is a powerful example of this transformative approach. After 25 years trapped in the diet cycle, I discovered the freedom of intuitive eating. Yet, even as my physical health improved, I felt something was missing – a deeper sense of fulfillment. It was through working with a mindset coach that I uncovered the missing piece: an intersectional feminist lens.

Reframing Well-Being Through Feminism

By examining the systemic issues of patriarchy and diet culture, I reframed my understanding of well-being. I realized true fulfillment goes far beyond chasing physical perfection. “Feminist well-being is a movement,” I say. “It’s about giving women the freedom to live life on our own terms, free from oppressive societal expectations.”

Reclaiming Our Worth Beyond the Body

At the heart of my vision is the recognition that women are more than just physical bodies. I invite you to ponder the profound question, “Why do I have a body as a woman?” This challenges the notion that our worth is tied to appearance or conformity to unrealistic beauty standards.

Creating Holistic Well-Being

Through my podcast, I aim to create a space for women to explore the intersections of feminism, mental health, emotional well-being, and spiritual fulfillment. I acknowledge that access to well-being is shaped by systemic factors like socioeconomic status, race, and ability.

Joining the Feminist Well-Being Movement

As I embark on this new chapter, I invite you to join me in this collective movement. Rate and review the podcast, engage in critical self-reflection, and take action – both individually and collectively. Together, we can create a more equitable and empowering future for all women.

What You’ll learn listening to this episode:

  • The limitations of traditional health-focused well-being
  • How to reframe well-being through an intersectional feminist lens
  • The importance of challenging societal expectations placed on women
  • Ways to reclaim our worth beyond the physical body
  • A holistic approach to well-being that goes beyond physical health

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

 

 

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385-Oprah, Weight Loss Drugs and Post-Show Analysis with Dr. Natalie Gentile

385-Oprah, Weight Loss Drugs and Post-Show Analysis with Dr. Natalie Gentile

Oprah, Weight Loss Drugs

Oprah, Weight Loss Drugs

Oprah Winfrey’s highly anticipated TV special on weight loss drugs sparked heated discussions around obesity, weight stigma, and promoting medication for cosmetic purposes. To provide a balanced, multi-disciplinary perspective, Stephanie sat down with Dr. Natalie Gentile, a weight-neutral physician, for an in-depth post-show analysis.

Dissecting the “Obesity Disease” Claim

One central claim was that obesity is a disease, repeated numerous times on the show. Dr. Gentile clarified that while the U.S. medically classifies obesity as a disease for insurance coverage of treatments, this view is not universally accepted. In Canada, for instance, obesity is not considered a disease by medical authorities, highlighting the varying expert perspectives on this complex issue.

The “Obesity Gene” Myth Debunked

Claims about an “obesity gene” were prominently featured. However, Dr. Gentile explained that while genetics likely influence body size, no specific “obesity gene” has been scientifically identified yet. Promoting this unsubstantiated idea could reinforce weight stigma and the notion that people in larger bodies are inherently diseased or flawed, Stephanie added.

Weight Loss Drugs: Benefits, Risks & Accessibility

The new GLP-1 agonist drugs like Ozempic and Wegovy were touted as groundbreaking solutions. From a medical perspective, Dr. Gentile acknowledged their potential benefits for some patients but highlighted concerns around side effects, nutrition deficiencies, high costs, and challenges with long-term adherence – especially for vulnerable groups. Furthermore, Stephanie questioned whether promoting drugs as a solution addresses deeper issues around weight stigma.

The Role of Internalized Weight Stigma

A central theme was participants describing how the drugs “turned off the voice” of obsessive food thoughts. Dr. Gentile proposed this could reflect reduced internalized weight stigma after weight loss, rather than a direct biological effect. Stephanie agreed – attributing it to quieting internalized weight bias and associated disordered thoughts around food when societal pressures to be thin are temporarily alleviated through weight loss.

Childhood Interventions: A Balanced Approach

The show featured a teen who had bariatric surgery, sparking debate. Dr. Gentile emphasized the need for nuanced, case-by-case approaches with family support rather than broadly recommending invasive interventions. Meanwhile, Stephanie added that any intervention must address potential psychological impacts of weight stigma on children and families first.

Industry Influence or Public Service?

While Oprah elevated important public discussions, both experts expressed disappointment that the show seemed to favor framing weight loss drugs as an ideal solution, with limited representation of dissenting medical views. Moreover, they speculated that any conflicts of interest that may emerge could shed light on the true motivations behind the show’s narratives.

Conclusion

This multi-expert analysis reminds us to approach weight and health with nuance, scientific integrity, psychological mastery, and compassion. Overcoming systemic weight stigma through inner work and wider societal change is paramount to achieving holistic well-being for all, regardless of size.

Dr. Natalie Gentile (she/her) is a board-certified Family Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine physician who owns a direct primary care practice in Pittsburgh, PA. She strives to meet patients where they are and, with a personal history of disordered eating, is passionate about running a weight-neutral practice that is a safe space for any and all.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode on Oprah and Weight Loss Drugs:

  • The truth behind claims that “obesity is a disease” and the “obesity gene” myth
  • Potential benefits and risks of drugs like Ozempic from a medical perspective
  • How internalized weight bias may drive the experience of drugs “turning off food obsession”
  • Insights on the delicate balance of childhood weight loss interventions

Mentioned in the show:

Free Resources and Training

Connect with our Guest:

Website – Dr. Natalie Gentile

Instagram – Dr. Natalie Gentile

Facebook – Dr. Natalie Gentile

 

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384-Healthy-ish with Dr. Jillian Murphy

384-Healthy-ish with Dr. Jillian Murphy

Healthy-ish with Dr. Jillian Murphy

If you are a woman who feels like you;’ve done all the things in the name of health, but you still can’t get it right this episode is for you!

Healthy-ish with Dr. Jillian Murphy 

Dr. Jillian Murphy is a naturopathic doctor with over 16 years experience in the field, and 10+ years in the Intuitive Eating and Health at Every Size space.

She helps women ditch divisive AF one way approaches to health and tap into their dreamy, vibrant feel-good lifestyle and body.

What you’ll learn listening to this episode:

  • What the heck is healthy-ish and what does it mean?
  • What Jillian has learn in 10 year in practice
  • How she is looking at her medical practice now

Mentioned in the show: 

Health Habits Checklist

Undiet Your Life Program

Non-Diet Coaching Certification

Connect with our guest:

Join the Healthyish Newsletter

Instagram – Jillian Murphy

Transcript

Going Beyond The Food Show Ep384-Healthy-ish with Dr. Jillian Murphy 

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This is episode 384 of the beyond the food show. And today we’re going to discover the word healthy ish together with our special guest Dr. Jillian Murphy. Stay tuned.

Hello, my sisters and welcome back to the podcast. Today is a fun episode. And it’s a return back in memory lane, I have invited a guest who’s been on the podcast in almost all of my special event I’ve hosted, Dr. Jillian Murphy, she is a naturopathic doctor with 10 plus year of experience in the world of the non diet approach intuitive eating health at every size.

And this is why she’s been on the podcast for so many times because we’re both oh geez, in the non diet spheres of talking about health. So we’ve collaborated many times. And about four months ago, I was doomscrolling Instagram and it came across this post from Jillian talking about this concept called healthy ish.

And I read the post, I’m like, Ooh, she piqued my curiosity. So as a good podcast host, I thought instead of having the conversation about what the heck is healthy ish in my DM with her, I thought let’s invite her on the podcast today for I think it’s the fifth time on the podcast. So we can have a public conversation about what the heck is healthy ish or new philosophy or new program or new way of talking about the non diet approach.

And let’s all discover healthy ish together. She surprised me in inviting me back on her podcast so that I can talk about my health and how I’m approaching my health at the personal level and I did that. So, we decided to combine releasing our podcast in the same week. So I’m releasing this podcast, the last week of November and she will be releasing her podcast the last week of November as well.

So you can opt between my podcast and her podcast, which her podcast is. Quote unquote, coincidentally named 100 percent Healthyish. So you can hop between my podcast and her podcast to get to know both of us. So since you are a listener of mine for a long time, I invite you to go and check out 100 percent Healthyish.

Dr. Jillian’s Murphy’s podcast and hear me talk about like, let’s take an inside, completely behind the scene view at my health and how I’m approaching my health today, live in 2023. Also, to discover more of Jillian’s content. So with that being said, I’m very excited to share this podcast. And also, I want you to take a note on something really important in my eyes, is that me and Jillian don’t agree on everything.

We don’t. And that’s okay. She has her perspective. I have my perspective. But and should I say and we respect each other. I think that’s the level of conversation we need to have more often with people. And I think we were able and we are able to have that conversation on many other topic which we’ve had.

Many time, not only on the podcast, but in our DMs, and defer opinion while still respecting, hearing, listening to each other’s opinion. But that in mind, a return on the podcast, Dr. Jillian Murphy, and let’s deep dive into this concept of 100 percent healthy ish.

Dr. Jillian: Welcome back to the podcast, Jillian.

Dr. Jillian: No, thanks for having me back. I’m excited.

Stephanie: It’s funny because I was preparing for the podcast and I was like, I Googled my name and your name to see how many times you’ve been on the podcast.

Dr. Jillian: Oh, how many times is this? The three times.

Stephanie: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah, this podcast has been going for seven years, so you’ve been on it in 2017. 2018 and 2020. Isn’t it crazy to think that?

Dr. Jillian: That’s wild. Love it. Love it.

Stephanie: And, the reason why you’re here today for everybody. the latest podcast was podcast two 35, where you were talking about integrating intuitive eating in a family setting.

Dr. Jillian: Yes. Yes.

Stephanie: That was the last time 2020 was at the pandemic state. I think we had just started the pandemic. Wow. And you’re here today because I still follow you on Instagram. And I saw This post a few months ago that talked about healthy ish, I’m like, what is she up to? And the podcast is the place where I have conversations, so what the heck is healthy ish?

Dr. Jillian: Well, a podcast is a perfect place for the conversation as well, because it’s a pretty nuanced conversation, right? I’m always very Wash with with it. And if I’m honest, it was like several years in the hopper before I fully rebranded and came out with it. So, you know, just a teeny bit of background and I won’t go too far because probably I go further into it in other episodes. I’ve clearly talked about this before, but I’m a naturopathic doctor. I was trained as a naturopath. I graduated in 2006. I was working as I would say, uh. Fairly standard general naturopath for many years. I was always sensitive to sort of things about food and weight because of my own history with an eating disorder. But I was still very much steeped in a lot of fat phobic health beliefs, etc. 2011, I have my second daughter. I am. confronted with a different body than I’d had in the past. And so I very quickly found, I shouldn’t say quickly, but like within the year found a body image coach who introduced me to health at every size and intuitive eating. And it opened up a whole new world for me.

Dr. Jillian: And so I spent a couple of years, deep in the personal side of the work, really freeing myself up from a lot of limiting beliefs and problematic health beliefs. And then I did extensive professional training. I studied under Ellen Satter for several years. I like, you know, through my own work, and my own study brought this into my practice and very slowly.

Dr. Jillian: This is the majority of the work that I do, right? So I do, I do like intuitive eating, some disordered eating and eating disorder work, which I still continue to this day and feel really, like it’s just so deeply important. I’m very proud of that work. but then, you know, and this was early days, like I remember even coming on your podcast for the first time and being nervous. To really fully lay out some of the truths that, that was 2017, you’re telling me, I thought it was even earlier because when I started doing this work and sharing it on Instagram, there was nobody really talking about this. Like a very small percentage of people were talking about this. It was very new. every day I had people like, Either saying, wow, this is amazing. It’s the first time I’ve ever heard of this or like you’re nuts. what are you even talking about? That’s not real. So it was really new. Now, fast forward to a few years ago, I had been doing this work for 10 years, you know, a little less than that. I guess it’s 10 years now. So seven years, my community had evolved. I had evolved as we all do as human beings. And this. Field had evolved. Now, everyone is talking about intuitive eating. You know, are they talking about it in the right way? I mean, who knows? But the point is, it’s well understood, there are many people doing a fabulous job of promoting this work and talking about it.

Dr. Jillian: There are many people who, if I’m being like perfectly bluntly honest, are in bigger bodies than I am doing this work that I feel like have more space to some extent. I was like re figuring out. I’m going to talk about my role in this world of sort of body acceptance, health at every size, and intuitive eating. And through the work that I did with Ellen Sater, and then through the work that I was doing in my community and one on one, I started to bump up against This space in place where women were free, I don’t want to say free because, you know, we’re all in process, but free from a lot of the really problematic health stories and weight stories and food stories that had been crushing them for decades.

Dr. Jillian: but they were now I, you know, 40 at that time. Many of the women in my community were in their mid thirties and up to mid fifties. We’re encountering. perimenopause were, starting to find little health concerns popping up that they hadn’t had before, or were getting to a place with intuitive eating where they felt like they were quote unquote quasi intuitive eating.

Dr. Jillian: Meaning, yeah, I’m intuitive eating. But it just, I still don’t feel great. I don’t feel right. And at first I sort of poo pooed it like, Oh, you just haven’t sunk in far enough, you know, but then, you know, eventually you have to start listening to the people that you’re working with. And I realized like I was, I had been there a little bit as well and had worked my way through, but the difficulty at that time, again, I’m going to just be really blunt and really honest is that the social media world, as we know, is so.

Dr. Jillian: All or nothing, this or that, you’re in or you’re out. and when it comes to this work, I get it because we were pushing back against such pervasive weight and toxic wellness beliefs. We had to push back really hard at first, but then it got to the point where I felt like, it felt like I couldn’t talk about eating well or putting any kind of intention or thoughtfulness or like getting back to this idea that I was working with.

Dr. Jillian: People who did have diabetes and needed to, like, just strategically sometimes watch their carb or sugar intake, that’s just a real thing. and then also just evolving into this understanding that, Yes, we want to be connected to our bodies. Of course, we want to be connected. We want to be considering our bodies, but there are many things in the way that we live our daily lives that interfere with the information that our body’s giving us sometimes. So, I guess when I’m, if I was going to, land the plane here, You know, when women often first start this work, as you well know, they’ve been in no’s for a really long time, right? saying no to everything, restriction, no’s,no. Then I felt like this bulk of my work was helping them learn how to say yes.

Dr. Jillian: How do we reclaim yes? How do we find the liberation and empowerment in yes? And then Healthish evolved when I realized that even though it’s part of intuitive eating, I don’t feel like there’s a strong enough framework for gentle nutrition. I don’t feel like there’s a strong enough framework for managing health conditions for most people.

Dr. Jillian: And I really felt like the next phase was how do we teach discernment? So how do we even teach people to say no again? With a better perspective, with the right motivation, staying in connection with their body. How do we do that? What does that look like? And so for many years I felt like I couldn’t talk about that because I felt like it would be misunderstood.

Dr. Jillian: So I was just kind of quietly doing it in private. And then, I don’t know, there was something about the post COVID world where all of a sudden I felt like people were ready and looking for a more nuanced conversation in all areas.

Stephanie: and I would just want to say it’s the way you’re describing. This is almost like a Stage two of intuitive eating.

Dr. Jillian: Yeah, and I always am quite careful because I know I genuinely believe That when they wrote that intuitive eating book, this is actually what they envisioned But again, I think in order to not negate all of the important work that has to happen first I don’t think they could go that deep Into this, because people would have latched on to that, they would have ignored all the rest, they would have gone to that chapter, they would have latched on to the lessons without having done the deep deprogramming work, and they would have just used it like a diet, because people did that anyway, right?

Dr. Jillian: So, I’m always careful because I think to a certain extent, like the other way that I sometimes describe this is that. When people start the work, their mind is running the show, right? Mind is fully, they’re often completely disconnected from the neck down.

Stephanie: Bubble head, I called. Great. You remember the bubble that in the 80s and 90s? We’re just bubble head.

Dr. Jillian: Exactly. And their brains are so diet culture trained and it’s running the show and it’s making bad decisions and it’s out of alignment with the body. And then again, the second part of the work, we reconnect to the body. And then again, this third piece of the work is how do we reintegrate, how do we bring the brain back in?

Dr. Jillian: Because, you know, when I started this healthy ish work. It was because my body was asking for chocolate multiple times a day, and that’s cool. I am, I, there’s no moral story I have about that. I still eat chocolate multiple times a day sometimes, but there was a point where I was like needing a nap every day and having headaches and feeling exhausted and I had done all the other work and finally I was like, I think maybe I just need to not eat chocolate through my heavy work days, just my heavy work days and experiment with that. Yeah. So I did and I felt better, but there was like, there was brain blocks. There was mental, like there was all kinds of resistance to that. am I dieting again? Where is this coming from? And this is what I was hearing from the women that I work with. there are certain things that I know are making me feel bad, but I don’t know how to manage that yet.

Dr. Jillian: So healthy ish is this attempt to provide a framework, a kind of part two or like senior level ninja level intuitive eating. So I, it’s I’m always, the reason I like the, I was saying with the podcast is I always like to be sure people know like they need to have done some of this other work first.

Dr. Jillian: This is not. for everyone. And if even listening to us talk about me reducing the chocolate in my day, pulls up big triggers in your body, there’s probably more work to do before you’re ready to make that decision. Yeah,

Stephanie: totally. It’s stage two. It’s where for me, what I, when you’re talking about, you know, the pendulum of health coming in the middle. So it’s great. Yeah, right. Because I do a lot of mindset work, as you know, in cognitive behavioral, and there’s patterns of thinking. And one of the pattern I literally see with every woman is black and white thinking. it’s so ingrained, we’re going to one side, there’s no gray side. So most of the mindset work is teaching people to be in the gray and how to be in the gray. And when I hear you talk about healthy ish, I hear the gray side of health.

Dr. Jillian: It’s gray. Yeah. It’s very gray. it’s still, the intuitive eating is a bit messy too. This is also just, it’s it’s messy to learn how to say yes. And then it’s a little bit messy to learn how to integrate no’s again and to have a framework for. So for instance, one of the reframes that I sometimes use is Again, foundation is always, our motivation is not manipulating our body. Our motivation is not disconnection or shutting ourselves down. Our goal is to feel the way we most want to feel in our body. Are there things, because you know, restriction is such a hot button word, but are there things that if you limited it, if you restricted it, and I don’t like that word, but let’s just say that’s the word they’re thinking of, it might actually open up something new and better for you. And so there are times when I have to limit my Netflix consumption. There are times when I have to put my phone down and there is discomfort in some of those things. But I know that, you know, I’m gonna put my phone away from 4 to 7 because I want to be present with my children when they’re home.

Dr. Jillian: That doesn’t mean that I don’t think about my phone or reach in my back pocket 17 times, you know. And then I learn how to manage that. And we can do the same with food without it being dieting or restricting at our own expense. If it is opening up something like Managing blood sugar in a really positive way or energy levels or migraines

Stephanie: or, yeah,

Stephanie: is it true to say it’s the intention that’s most important?

Dr. Jillian: Yeah, yeah, and it’s, and it’s messy. Sometimes women will say, well, I just finished this 3 week healthiest reset. So we did like a reset, which is basically. I feel like it’s a fun way to experiment with putting some parameters for a very short period of time when you’re eating. Again, there’s lots of education about the motivation and how we’re going to set the parameters.

Dr. Jillian: And, one of the things that I build into my resets is flexibility. So they have to set some parameters and then they have to practice breaking them and coming back to their, you know, like that is also a skill I feel like most people don’t have, you know, it’s No rules or all rules and they have zero ability to move back and forth comfortably.

Dr. Jillian: And when I say rules, you know, I just mean like intentions and parameters, but, you know, one woman said, well, how do we, anytime I start to put some effort and thought back into my food, I immediately start thinking about my body all day long. How do I manage that? And so same, it was like, I used the phone analogy, like it’s going to be, there’s going to be this association. We have to practice retraining ourselves, reminding ourselves that’s not what this is about. I can see why my brain wants to go there. How does my body feel? How do we continue to pull our attention back to the thing that really matters? and yeah, a year or two ago, that woman may not have been able to do this, but she was ready for it.

Dr. Jillian: And so it was like, okay. Yeah, I can do this. How do we, another thing that we work through in, the reset is like managing feelings of being a victim when we say no to something. So, so let me just see if I can, say this properly, butUm, we practice figuring out what our longer term goals are for how we want to feel in our body.

Dr. Jillian: And when we’re setting parameters, we’re thinking about are there some simple tweaks that we could flexibly make to our eating to achieve these longer term goals? But in the process of doing that, we need to learn how to manage the discomfort of not having instant gratification all the time. And part of learning to eat intuitively is part is like I encourage people to give in to instant gratification because they’ve been so cut off from that, you know, but now we have to reel ourselves back just like we do with so many highly concentrated experiences in life, right?

Dr. Jillian: TV, social media, caffeine. Alcoholic. These are all concentrated experiences that, you know, with no moral judgment around them can be used really well or can be problematic. And how do we start to define where we sit best with these things? We can do the same with food, but we have to learn how to manage.

Dr. Jillian: you know, there’s like a whole exercise that I work through of like, Me saying no to ice cream one night on vacation because dairy actually upsets me a lot like not dairy ice cream specifically. And so I had set a parameter that I would like only eat ice cream X number of times on holiday and like again, I’m not talking like, instead of eating it 14 times I had it like 4 times or 5 like I wasn’t deprived.

Dr. Jillian: I was well fed. I was well nourished. I was just limiting the amount of times that I ate. this specific food that really upsets me, you know? So I said no to it one night at dinner, then I immediately fell into I’m not fun. I’m so deprived. I’m such like, poor me. And then I had to, you know, we go through this whole example of reworking ourselves out of those thoughts into am I deprived?

Dr. Jillian: no, I made sure that I had enough to eat. And if I want more, I can have more dinner if I want it. If I want, there was like strawberries and a few other dessert things. if I want those things, I can have them. Am I a victim? no, I’m an adult. I’m making a choice. I want to feel better when I go to sleep tonight.

Dr. Jillian: I don’t want to feel better in the morning. I’m choosing to do this because it’s going to allow me to feel the way I want to feel in my body and not get back from this holiday a complete wreck, which has happened to me before. And soit’s just exploring that, right? It’s exploring the feelings and the thoughts that come up when we consider making a choice.

Dr. Jillian: That isn’t an automatic yes for our health and learning from it. And there’s no right answer. There’s no right answer.

Stephanie: How do you work through associating, I’ll use the example of being a wreck after the holiday with it being more than just a food that made you a wreck? Do you know, like people often go to Oh, it’s the high screen. Like it’s just didn’t have the ice cream. I would have been a wreck. Meanwhile, they like their sleep cycle change because they’re on holiday. They walked more if they’re doing tourists. there’s so many other factors that change the food.

Dr. Jillian: Well, yeah, and so, you know, with the three week reset, we’re focused a little bit more on food just because, it’s three weeks and we just got to play with one thing, but I always talk about this in the program, even if it’s a short program, about if we’re, like, hyper fixated on the food, we’re already in the wrong spot.

Dr. Jillian: if your only consideration for how your body feels is what you ate, then you’re getting stuck back in some old diet mentality stuff, because you’re absolutely right. later nights. I mean, I drink way more. I drink way more coffee and alcohol, right? Like sleeping different. having no alone time to recharge.

Stephanie: Uh, simulated all the time with new stuff. And

Dr. Jillian: yeah, yeah, yeah. So remembering always that when it comes to health, when it comes to managing health, even when it comes to managing health conditions, we’re never going to get hyper fixated. On just food and movement or supplements, you know, but sometimes within this world, that’s what I’m working on. But we’re always, of course, considering like there’s a whole, even in the three week reset, there’s a whole lesson on cycles. And like, where are you in the world as you do this reset? What is the season? If you have a cycle, where are you at in your cycle? And how can you stay connected to that, you know, and considerate of it, without feeling like you are a victim to it, to your body and every whim and urge and craving.

Dr. Jillian: So, yeah, to me this is just an evolution. the work that we’ve all been doing, yeah,

Stephanie: but more specifically you because I want to emphasize the fact that we had a DM conversation a few months ago around that, that you’re licensed to practice medicine, you’re not just I’m saying that and I’m a nutritionist, but yeah, I’m a nutritionist, but I’m not licensed to practice medicine.

Stephanie: Hmm. Do you see what I’m saying? there’s a difference because you have different caseload that I have that need a different lens.

Dr. Jillian: that’s it. And so, for me, when I finally stepped out of this was owning the fact that just because this work isn’t right for everyone doesn’t mean it’s not right for or needed by anyone.

Dr. Jillian: Right. And me being able to, that I’m really good at it because I’ve done it for a long time. Now, if someone’s ready for this or not ready for it. You know, like it’s pretty apparent based on even how they talk about what’s happening with them, how they, and I will say, as a naturopath, even throughout all my intuitive eating years, there were definitely people that were coming to me who were further through the spectrum already.

Dr. Jillian: You know, and they were ready for this work, and I just wasn’t ready to give it to them yet. So I mean, you were in your

Stephanie: own

Dr. Jillian: black and white. Yes. Yeah. And I was in my own, everybody’s in diet mentality. And we have to be very afraid if somebody is like, cutting out gluten or whatever it would like it. I was like, I was exercising this muscle of Permission and trying to teach that and again, I’ve just evolved into this space of like, we can be accepting of the bodies that we’re in. We can be accepting of some of the health challenges that we have without being ambivalent. That’s 1 of the biggest things Ellen Satter taught me.

Dr. Jillian: We don’t need to be ambivalent. We can consider what’s happening. So ambivalent is. Ignoring or going unconscious or not caring about it. So, you can accept your body and be like, Okay, this is my body, this is the weight that I’m at. maybe you have diabetes or you have high, what, high blood pressure or you’re going through perimenopause.

Dr. Jillian: I can be accepting of that and I don’t need to fight it. But I don’t need to just ignore it or not care about it either. I can put some intention into taking care of this body that I’m in. And that’s not a negative thing. It’s a great thing. You just want to make sure you know, of course, that you’re led by someone who isn’t going to pull you back into hyper fixating on a single food or whatever

Stephanie: supplement cleanse or I’ll take the most recently I’ve been sharing a lot of story about a knee injury and I’m in, I live in a larger body. So traditional medicine, the first thing they went to is your weight and I had to set my boundaries. So the K team. All of you listen. I’m going to do everything you want me to do except go on a diet and lose weight. So give me a protocol for somebody that is a normal size for a knee injury and I’ll do it all.

Stephanie: Like I won’t just wait for it to be fixed. I will be actively working towards my health. So I have now, six months later, still a regimen of stretching and strengthening and all of that. I’m doing what I need to be doing for the health of my knee, except one thing, which is to lose weight. But that doesn’t mean because I don’t want to lose weight that I don’t do anything. That would be the right thing.

Dr. Jillian: Right. Yeah. Or you don’t care about your knee or you’re just going to ignore it and be like, well. let go and let God or whatever they say, you know, no, you don’t have to do that. Right. And so again, I think my work has focused a little bit more on the food movement side of things because it’s trickier.

Dr. Jillian: Like I felt like for many years I did add ins right. So just like supplements, the things that we can add in. and then again, I just felt like there was just this next little thing that, that there was a group of people who really needed to be able to explore. But you know, again, always within context, like if somebody has, I had lunch with a friend, earlier this week and, she did this whole hypnotherapy program for IBS and like, amazing.

Dr. Jillian: If there’s a way to control IBS without needing to be on a highly restrictive diet, like I’m always looking for multifaceted approaches. And you know, if someone has blood sugar that’s out of control and their doctor saying you’re diabetic or pre diabetic, how’s your sleep? We know that terrible sleep leads to out of control blood sugar, like always, always, always, like I feel obviously like all of this other work that I’ve done for years has landed me in this place where I can have a great perspective while helping people, be a little bit more intentional with their food and movement and supplement protocols. Yeah,

Stephanie: and the intention, like I, like we were saying in the beginning, not being losing weight. But supporting your body more,

Dr. Jillian: that’s it. That’s literally it. It’s like we just take that one thing out of the equation and we learn to manage all of the feelings that pop up that want to pull us back into that and also the feelings that kind of were developed or came about as people learn to say yes to themselves.

Dr. Jillian: Like they had to really sometimes be like, I’m allowed. I deserve it. I’m worth it. But How could we bring those phrases into discernment instead of just yeses? Like you’re allowed. Yes. You’re allowed. Of course. You’re always allowed as an adult. You can do whatever you want to do. What would you like to do?

Dr. Jillian: Right? If we bring the body and the mind back together, what would you like to do? You know, I love caffeine. My body would happily have caffeine all day, every day, but my sleep. is not good. So I make choices around that, right? Sometimes I set a parameter on my caffeine intake. It doesn’t mean it’s always easy because I’m Irish and we want to drink black tea after everything, all hours of the day and night, you know, but it doesn’t serve me.

Dr. Jillian: So I make choices about that. It’s just trickier when it comes to certain foods because the thought processes get messy for people and they need help. Sifting through it,

Stephanie: I think for me, the word you said here is key is the thought process because as you were talking, I often talk about rebellious eating and often the risk, like eating, and you eat whatever emotionally eating and response because you’re angry, but emotional rebellious eating can swing the other way where there’s no more nose.

Stephanie: It’s just yes. Now you’re rebelliously eating. In another way, still the answer is no rebellious eating either way, it’s the middle.

Dr. Jillian: Well, I talk about this all the time because, women will say, if someone even merely suggests that I might need to look at my food, I’m eating it, it’s that, you know, that saying which is like cutting off your own nose to spite your face. And if this food actually makes you feel bad and you’re kind of aware of it, like you’re not rebelling against diet culture at this point. You’re rebelling against yourself. Yes.

Dr. Jillian: Right. And there’s like a level of safety that we need to create or find so that you don’t need to rebel. That you feel safe enough that you can just make choices. Like you’re not constantly worried that someone’s about to crush your safety.

Stephanie: Yeah, you’re rebelling against yourself because you’re being inconsiderate of supporting your body with food with and it’s the same thing. If we were to talk about movement, I mean, yeah, how many women are stuck in the no phase of movement because they use the too much to shrink their body. So now they’re stuck in and I was there for 5 years of not moving your body. And that has side effects.

Dr. Jillian: Yeah. Yeah. It’s we have to get clear on the fact that sometimes there are pros to taking a break from exercise, but there are also side effects to not moving our body.

Dr. Jillian: And it’s not diet culture to be aware of those things and consider them and learn how to work our way through. Right. So, I feel like it’s a really exciting conversation. And like I said, I think that if there’s anyone who listens to this. And it pulls up negative feelings. That’s okay. set the episode aside and get, there’ll be a moment where you’re like ready and then you’re like, what was that? Okay. Who are those two women talking about this thing? Because there are rare cases where I think people are never ready for this. Like maybe there’s just been too much trauma around their body or food or whatever. And that’s fine because the healthiest thing that people can be doing is just getting enough food, like bottom line, you know, eating enough and eating regularly and all of that. So they’re already nine tenths of the way there. This is like the cherry on the icing on the cake. You know what I mean?

Stephanie: how would you to the person listening who’s triggered by this and not ready for this? What would you say is the thing they can do to be ready for that healthiest conversation?

Dr. Jillian: Well, what that always pulls up for me is that they’re feeling pressure. So, something about us talking about this is making them feel pressured to do something. And so, just reminding themselves that they’re not pressured to do anything. They can always make choices. And if this feels like too much pressure, then what I tend to redirect people back toward is like neutralizing their relationship with food, feeding themselves right, just get back into that, like neutralizing their own. moral judgments about food, like there must be some in there for them still.

Dr. Jillian: Because like internalized sexism, internalized misogyny. Like you are now applying it to yourself. I mean, there’s also the possibility that people outside of you are applying it to you. Fine. Fair enough. But often, like if people are in a situation where this is interesting, but oh my God, I can’t.

Dr. Jillian: It’s like, where have you internalized? Stories about your own body, about food, about movement, is there a way for you to start challenging that, creating more and more safety within yourself, knowing that, you know, the outside world is always going to be putting weird pressures on us, awful pressures that we can’t necessarily mitigate, you know.

Dr. Jillian: but I feel like most often when people have that triggered reaction, it’s like we’re finding the wound. That’s what we’re finding. A trigger is the wound. So what healing needs to happen there? What do you need to happen so that you are, because this is interesting actually, because what I would hear from most women is that this quasi eating phase that they would find themselves in still didn’t fully feel like liberation or control or agency.

Dr. Jillian: Right. And so when we find the wound, it’s like, what do we need to heal up so that you can actually reclaim full empowerment, like at first it felt like empowerment and agency to say yes, but then eventually it starts to be like, but if I can’t also say no to something that really doesn’t feel good in my body and affects me negatively.

Dr. Jillian: That doesn’t really feel like freedom either, you know? So what do we need to heal up? that’s the wound. What do we need to heal up? Where do we need to create more safety? Where do you need to feel like you are fully in control of the decisions that you’re making? What thoughts? What behaviors? What understandings? What do we need to shift so that you can trust yourself to make the right choices for you?

Stephanie: What would you say to the person who’s listening to this? Been around intuitive eating for a while perhaps in the journey and she says, oh, that’s the way of doing intuitive eating So I don’t feel out of control

Dr. Jillian: because she’s feeling out of control right now Well, there’s a couple of different ways of looking at that. So the first is the other thing I really learned from Ellen Satter, which I didn’t get, what, because she does competent eating, which is a little different, right? We talked about this from intuitive eating, is that she does always provide some structure for the people that she works with.

Dr. Jillian: And I have found along the way through eating disorder work, as well as just disordered eating work, that there are some people who need some structure right out of the gate. they just cannot, there are some people who need no structure, like even the mere mention of structure. They’ve been, the other analogy I use for this, which might be helpful for your clientele, I’m not sure, is, Barbara Colaroso is a parenting expert, so she writes parenting and, she’d talk about the brick wall parent.

Dr. Jillian: Sometimes, you know, the dictator parent, the brick wall parent, right? They have the rules. They never bend them. They never consider the cut. That’s the dieter, right? The brick wall. That’s the plan. I’m sticking with it. I don’t care if I’m nearly passing out or I have a headache I’m sticking with. Then there’s the jellyfish parent often born from a brick wall parent who has no rules and no parameters and stare as late as you want.

Dr. Jillian: And Children don’t actually feel particularly safe in either of these households, because they don’t feel safe if they’re not heard or considered, and they don’t feel safe, there’s zero structure, and it feels like nobody’s caring for you, it’s like a 24 7 party, that doesn’t feel good to a kid either, and so what we’re trying to do as parents is become these, she calls them backbone parents, where there’s this flexible backbone, where there’s some structureAnd this is the analogy I use as well, like sometimes when we leave dieting, we become jellyfish and we’ve got to come back to this.

Dr. Jillian: So I’d say, actually you could experiment with it, but if it makes things worse, you’re doing it for the wrong reasons.

Stephanie: I’ll say this, meet the gray space, you have to have gone to the black and white space. Yeah, like to be able to be flexible, you have to know both and say, I don’t want this and I don’t want this.

Stephanie: And I want something here in the middle, but completely avoiding this, you’re missing out building safety for being in all part of life.

Dr. Jillian: I’m thinking about I’m seeing like. big splotches of paint, right? And you can’t make gray if you haven’t dipped your hand into the black and into the white. So, right. So yeah, like I’ll say yes and no’s are flip sides of the same coin.

Dr. Jillian: So if you can’t own a yes, you cannot properly own a no. they’re limited by the extent to which you can explore each one of those things. So I would agree with you. I love this, like taking these splotches of color. If you want to create gray, you know, you can’t just have been a dieter who’s been really reacting negatively to dieting and then think all of a sudden you can just be in gray.

Stephanie: You know? You have to have both. Yeah. And the exploration is born out of safety. For you to be able to explore the both side, you need to be able to have the safety within yourself from yourself to yourself and that’s built. By trusting yourself through every phase of eating. I love that. Is there anything else you would like people to know about Healthish? And where can they find out more about Healthish with you?

Dr. Jillian: Well, the link that I’ve given you is healthishnewsletter. com. And there’s like a two week series, which is kind of fun. Because some of it may be familiar. It’s it’s like breaking down sayings that I hate in the wellness culture, but it’s fun because some of them are really diety and some of them are not.

Dr. Jillian: Some of them are kind of anti diety and I’m like, well, let’s look at what I don’t love about this either, you know? so that’s a really great way to get introduced to the concept and to me and to find out more about this work. I don’t know if there’s anything else I want people to know, but just that.

Dr. Jillian: You have your podcast. Oh, yes. I have a podcast. Yeah. It’s 100 percent healthy. It used to be food, freedom, body love, but it’s 100 percent healthy ish. And Stephanie, you’re going to come be on as well in a couple of weeks. and there’s all kinds of great conversations there as well. as I’ve moved from where I was into this, I think there’s lots of interesting conversations around reintegrating wellness.

Dr. Jillian: In a less toxic way because there’s good stuff in there if we come at it with a really good critical thinking mind and we’re clear on what we value and how we want to feel in our bodies. There’s so much goodness in there.

Stephanie: Anybody that’s listening to this that have a medicalized condition or diagnosed condition, I will just say you can work with them. And often people from my world are not equipped for that. They need to refer out. So yeah, you’re the resource within intuitive eating health at every size for people with conditions.

Dr. Jillian: Yeah. Hello at healthyish. ca. there’s a dash healthy ish. ca. You can email me. Yes, we can work with it.

Stephanie: Yeah, and that’s the conversation we had on DM, like if I had the need for a health condition, you’d be the first person I would go to because I would know you have all these principles in this baseline. I wouldn’t be served what I don’t need to be served.

Dr. Jillian: No, you don’t need to be super restrictive to manage diabetes. You don’t need to be super restrictive to manage high cholesterol. that is not true. It backfires. It’s bad. But we can be intentional and thoughtful at the same time.

Stephanie: Yeah. Yeah. That was a beautiful conversation. I’m happy we had it. And I love to be able to introduce people to my listener who have a great view. It’s not dichotomy on the one side to the other is disability to be in the middle safely.

Dr. Jillian: Thank you. I love it. Thanks for having me.

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Episode 384-Healthy-ish with Dr. Jillian Murphy 

This is episode 384 of the beyond the food show. And today we’re going to discover the word healthy ish together with our special guest Dr. Jillian Murphy. Stay tuned.

Hello, my sisters and welcome back to the podcast. Today is a fun episode. And it’s a return back in memory lane, I have invited a guest who’s been on the podcast in almost all of my special event I’ve hosted, Dr. Jillian Murphy, she is a naturopathic doctor with 10 plus year of experience in the world of the non diet approach intuitive eating health at every size.

And this is why she’s been on the podcast for so many times because we’re both oh geez, in the non diet spheres of talking about health. So we’ve collaborated many times. And about four months ago, I was doomscrolling Instagram and it came across this post from Jillian talking about this concept called healthy ish.

And I read the post, I’m like, Ooh, she piqued my curiosity. So as a good podcast host, I thought instead of having the conversation about what the heck is healthy ish in my DM with her, I thought let’s invite her on the podcast today for I think it’s the fifth time on the podcast. So we can have a public conversation about what the heck is healthy ish or new philosophy or new program or new way of talking about the non diet approach.

And let’s all discover healthy ish together. She surprised me in inviting me back on her podcast so that I can talk about my health and how I’m approaching my health at the personal level and I did that. So, we decided to combine releasing our podcast in the same week. So I’m releasing this podcast, the last week of November and she will be releasing her podcast the last week of November as well.

So you can opt between my podcast and her podcast, which her podcast is. Quote unquote, coincidentally named 100 percent Healthyish. So you can hop between my podcast and her podcast to get to know both of us. So since you are a listener of mine for a long time, I invite you to go and check out 100 percent Healthyish.

Dr. Jillian’s Murphy’s podcast and hear me talk about like, let’s take an inside, completely behind the scene view at my health and how I’m approaching my health today, live in 2023. Also, to discover more of Jillian’s content. So with that being said, I’m very excited to share this podcast. And also, I want you to take a note on something really important in my eyes, is that me and Jillian don’t agree on everything.

We don’t. And that’s okay. She has her perspective. I have my perspective. But and should I say and we respect each other. I think that’s the level of conversation we need to have more often with people. And I think we were able and we are able to have that conversation on many other topic which we’ve had.

Many time, not only on the podcast, but in our DMs, and defer opinion while still respecting, hearing, listening to each other’s opinion. But that in mind, a return on the podcast, Dr. Jillian Murphy, and let’s deep dive into this concept of 100 percent healthy ish.

Dr. Jillian: Welcome back to the podcast, Jillian.

Dr. Jillian: No, thanks for having me back. I’m excited.

Stephanie: It’s funny because I was preparing for the podcast and I was like, I Googled my name and your name to see how many times you’ve been on the podcast.

Dr. Jillian: Oh, how many times is this? The three times.

Stephanie: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah, this podcast has been going for seven years, so you’ve been on it in 2017. 2018 and 2020. Isn’t it crazy to think that?

Dr. Jillian: That’s wild. Love it. Love it.

Stephanie: And, the reason why you’re here today for everybody. the latest podcast was podcast two 35, where you were talking about integrating intuitive eating in a family setting.

Dr. Jillian: Yes. Yes.

Stephanie: That was the last time 2020 was at the pandemic state. I think we had just started the pandemic. Wow. And you’re here today because I still follow you on Instagram. And I saw This post a few months ago that talked about healthy ish, I’m like, what is she up to? And the podcast is the place where I have conversations, so what the heck is healthy ish?

Dr. Jillian: Well, a podcast is a perfect place for the conversation as well, because it’s a pretty nuanced conversation, right? I’m always very Wash with with it. And if I’m honest, it was like several years in the hopper before I fully rebranded and came out with it. So, you know, just a teeny bit of background and I won’t go too far because probably I go further into it in other episodes. I’ve clearly talked about this before, but I’m a naturopathic doctor. I was trained as a naturopath. I graduated in 2006. I was working as I would say, uh. Fairly standard general naturopath for many years. I was always sensitive to sort of things about food and weight because of my own history with an eating disorder. But I was still very much steeped in a lot of fat phobic health beliefs, etc. 2011, I have my second daughter. I am. confronted with a different body than I’d had in the past. And so I very quickly found, I shouldn’t say quickly, but like within the year found a body image coach who introduced me to health at every size and intuitive eating. And it opened up a whole new world for me.

Dr. Jillian: And so I spent a couple of years, deep in the personal side of the work, really freeing myself up from a lot of limiting beliefs and problematic health beliefs. And then I did extensive professional training. I studied under Ellen Satter for several years. I like, you know, through my own work, and my own study brought this into my practice and very slowly.

Dr. Jillian: This is the majority of the work that I do, right? So I do, I do like intuitive eating, some disordered eating and eating disorder work, which I still continue to this day and feel really, like it’s just so deeply important. I’m very proud of that work. but then, you know, and this was early days, like I remember even coming on your podcast for the first time and being nervous. To really fully lay out some of the truths that, that was 2017, you’re telling me, I thought it was even earlier because when I started doing this work and sharing it on Instagram, there was nobody really talking about this. Like a very small percentage of people were talking about this. It was very new. every day I had people like, Either saying, wow, this is amazing. It’s the first time I’ve ever heard of this or like you’re nuts. what are you even talking about? That’s not real. So it was really new. Now, fast forward to a few years ago, I had been doing this work for 10 years, you know, a little less than that. I guess it’s 10 years now. So seven years, my community had evolved. I had evolved as we all do as human beings. And this. Field had evolved. Now, everyone is talking about intuitive eating. You know, are they talking about it in the right way? I mean, who knows? But the point is, it’s well understood, there are many people doing a fabulous job of promoting this work and talking about it.

Dr. Jillian: There are many people who, if I’m being like perfectly bluntly honest, are in bigger bodies than I am doing this work that I feel like have more space to some extent. I was like re figuring out. I’m going to talk about my role in this world of sort of body acceptance, health at every size, and intuitive eating. And through the work that I did with Ellen Sater, and then through the work that I was doing in my community and one on one, I started to bump up against This space in place where women were free, I don’t want to say free because, you know, we’re all in process, but free from a lot of the really problematic health stories and weight stories and food stories that had been crushing them for decades.

Dr. Jillian: but they were now I, you know, 40 at that time. Many of the women in my community were in their mid thirties and up to mid fifties. We’re encountering. perimenopause were, starting to find little health concerns popping up that they hadn’t had before, or were getting to a place with intuitive eating where they felt like they were quote unquote quasi intuitive eating.

Dr. Jillian: Meaning, yeah, I’m intuitive eating. But it just, I still don’t feel great. I don’t feel right. And at first I sort of poo pooed it like, Oh, you just haven’t sunk in far enough, you know, but then, you know, eventually you have to start listening to the people that you’re working with. And I realized like I was, I had been there a little bit as well and had worked my way through, but the difficulty at that time, again, I’m going to just be really blunt and really honest is that the social media world, as we know, is so.

Dr. Jillian: All or nothing, this or that, you’re in or you’re out. and when it comes to this work, I get it because we were pushing back against such pervasive weight and toxic wellness beliefs. We had to push back really hard at first, but then it got to the point where I felt like, it felt like I couldn’t talk about eating well or putting any kind of intention or thoughtfulness or like getting back to this idea that I was working with.

Dr. Jillian: People who did have diabetes and needed to, like, just strategically sometimes watch their carb or sugar intake, that’s just a real thing. and then also just evolving into this understanding that, Yes, we want to be connected to our bodies. Of course, we want to be connected. We want to be considering our bodies, but there are many things in the way that we live our daily lives that interfere with the information that our body’s giving us sometimes. So, I guess when I’m, if I was going to, land the plane here, You know, when women often first start this work, as you well know, they’ve been in no’s for a really long time, right? saying no to everything, restriction, no’s,no. Then I felt like this bulk of my work was helping them learn how to say yes.

Dr. Jillian: How do we reclaim yes? How do we find the liberation and empowerment in yes? And then Healthish evolved when I realized that even though it’s part of intuitive eating, I don’t feel like there’s a strong enough framework for gentle nutrition. I don’t feel like there’s a strong enough framework for managing health conditions for most people.

Dr. Jillian: And I really felt like the next phase was how do we teach discernment? So how do we even teach people to say no again? With a better perspective, with the right motivation, staying in connection with their body. How do we do that? What does that look like? And so for many years I felt like I couldn’t talk about that because I felt like it would be misunderstood.

Dr. Jillian: So I was just kind of quietly doing it in private. And then, I don’t know, there was something about the post COVID world where all of a sudden I felt like people were ready and looking for a more nuanced conversation in all areas.

Stephanie: and I would just want to say it’s the way you’re describing. This is almost like a Stage two of intuitive eating.

Dr. Jillian: Yeah, and I always am quite careful because I know I genuinely believe That when they wrote that intuitive eating book, this is actually what they envisioned But again, I think in order to not negate all of the important work that has to happen first I don’t think they could go that deep Into this, because people would have latched on to that, they would have ignored all the rest, they would have gone to that chapter, they would have latched on to the lessons without having done the deep deprogramming work, and they would have just used it like a diet, because people did that anyway, right?

Dr. Jillian: So, I’m always careful because I think to a certain extent, like the other way that I sometimes describe this is that. When people start the work, their mind is running the show, right? Mind is fully, they’re often completely disconnected from the neck down.

Stephanie: Bubble head, I called. Great. You remember the bubble that in the 80s and 90s? We’re just bubble head.

Dr. Jillian: Exactly. And their brains are so diet culture trained and it’s running the show and it’s making bad decisions and it’s out of alignment with the body. And then again, the second part of the work, we reconnect to the body. And then again, this third piece of the work is how do we reintegrate, how do we bring the brain back in?

Dr. Jillian: Because, you know, when I started this healthy ish work. It was because my body was asking for chocolate multiple times a day, and that’s cool. I am, I, there’s no moral story I have about that. I still eat chocolate multiple times a day sometimes, but there was a point where I was like needing a nap every day and having headaches and feeling exhausted and I had done all the other work and finally I was like, I think maybe I just need to not eat chocolate through my heavy work days, just my heavy work days and experiment with that. Yeah. So I did and I felt better, but there was like, there was brain blocks. There was mental, like there was all kinds of resistance to that. am I dieting again? Where is this coming from? And this is what I was hearing from the women that I work with. there are certain things that I know are making me feel bad, but I don’t know how to manage that yet.

Dr. Jillian: So healthy ish is this attempt to provide a framework, a kind of part two or like senior level ninja level intuitive eating. So I, it’s I’m always, the reason I like the, I was saying with the podcast is I always like to be sure people know like they need to have done some of this other work first.

Dr. Jillian: This is not. for everyone. And if even listening to us talk about me reducing the chocolate in my day, pulls up big triggers in your body, there’s probably more work to do before you’re ready to make that decision. Yeah,

Stephanie: totally. It’s stage two. It’s where for me, what I, when you’re talking about, you know, the pendulum of health coming in the middle. So it’s great. Yeah, right. Because I do a lot of mindset work, as you know, in cognitive behavioral, and there’s patterns of thinking. And one of the pattern I literally see with every woman is black and white thinking. it’s so ingrained, we’re going to one side, there’s no gray side. So most of the mindset work is teaching people to be in the gray and how to be in the gray. And when I hear you talk about healthy ish, I hear the gray side of health.

Dr. Jillian: It’s gray. Yeah. It’s very gray. it’s still, the intuitive eating is a bit messy too. This is also just, it’s it’s messy to learn how to say yes. And then it’s a little bit messy to learn how to integrate no’s again and to have a framework for. So for instance, one of the reframes that I sometimes use is Again, foundation is always, our motivation is not manipulating our body. Our motivation is not disconnection or shutting ourselves down. Our goal is to feel the way we most want to feel in our body. Are there things, because you know, restriction is such a hot button word, but are there things that if you limited it, if you restricted it, and I don’t like that word, but let’s just say that’s the word they’re thinking of, it might actually open up something new and better for you. And so there are times when I have to limit my Netflix consumption. There are times when I have to put my phone down and there is discomfort in some of those things. But I know that, you know, I’m gonna put my phone away from 4 to 7 because I want to be present with my children when they’re home.

Dr. Jillian: That doesn’t mean that I don’t think about my phone or reach in my back pocket 17 times, you know. And then I learn how to manage that. And we can do the same with food without it being dieting or restricting at our own expense. If it is opening up something like Managing blood sugar in a really positive way or energy levels or migraines

Stephanie: or, yeah,

Stephanie: is it true to say it’s the intention that’s most important?

Dr. Jillian: Yeah, yeah, and it’s, and it’s messy. Sometimes women will say, well, I just finished this 3 week healthiest reset. So we did like a reset, which is basically. I feel like it’s a fun way to experiment with putting some parameters for a very short period of time when you’re eating. Again, there’s lots of education about the motivation and how we’re going to set the parameters.

Dr. Jillian: And, one of the things that I build into my resets is flexibility. So they have to set some parameters and then they have to practice breaking them and coming back to their, you know, like that is also a skill I feel like most people don’t have, you know, it’s No rules or all rules and they have zero ability to move back and forth comfortably.

Dr. Jillian: And when I say rules, you know, I just mean like intentions and parameters, but, you know, one woman said, well, how do we, anytime I start to put some effort and thought back into my food, I immediately start thinking about my body all day long. How do I manage that? And so same, it was like, I used the phone analogy, like it’s going to be, there’s going to be this association. We have to practice retraining ourselves, reminding ourselves that’s not what this is about. I can see why my brain wants to go there. How does my body feel? How do we continue to pull our attention back to the thing that really matters? and yeah, a year or two ago, that woman may not have been able to do this, but she was ready for it.

Dr. Jillian: And so it was like, okay. Yeah, I can do this. How do we, another thing that we work through in, the reset is like managing feelings of being a victim when we say no to something. So, so let me just see if I can, say this properly, butUm, we practice figuring out what our longer term goals are for how we want to feel in our body.

Dr. Jillian: And when we’re setting parameters, we’re thinking about are there some simple tweaks that we could flexibly make to our eating to achieve these longer term goals? But in the process of doing that, we need to learn how to manage the discomfort of not having instant gratification all the time. And part of learning to eat intuitively is part is like I encourage people to give in to instant gratification because they’ve been so cut off from that, you know, but now we have to reel ourselves back just like we do with so many highly concentrated experiences in life, right?

Dr. Jillian: TV, social media, caffeine. Alcoholic. These are all concentrated experiences that, you know, with no moral judgment around them can be used really well or can be problematic. And how do we start to define where we sit best with these things? We can do the same with food, but we have to learn how to manage.

Dr. Jillian: you know, there’s like a whole exercise that I work through of like, Me saying no to ice cream one night on vacation because dairy actually upsets me a lot like not dairy ice cream specifically. And so I had set a parameter that I would like only eat ice cream X number of times on holiday and like again, I’m not talking like, instead of eating it 14 times I had it like 4 times or 5 like I wasn’t deprived.

Dr. Jillian: I was well fed. I was well nourished. I was just limiting the amount of times that I ate. this specific food that really upsets me, you know? So I said no to it one night at dinner, then I immediately fell into I’m not fun. I’m so deprived. I’m such like, poor me. And then I had to, you know, we go through this whole example of reworking ourselves out of those thoughts into am I deprived?

Dr. Jillian: no, I made sure that I had enough to eat. And if I want more, I can have more dinner if I want it. If I want, there was like strawberries and a few other dessert things. if I want those things, I can have them. Am I a victim? no, I’m an adult. I’m making a choice. I want to feel better when I go to sleep tonight.

Dr. Jillian: I don’t want to feel better in the morning. I’m choosing to do this because it’s going to allow me to feel the way I want to feel in my body and not get back from this holiday a complete wreck, which has happened to me before. And soit’s just exploring that, right? It’s exploring the feelings and the thoughts that come up when we consider making a choice.

Dr. Jillian: That isn’t an automatic yes for our health and learning from it. And there’s no right answer. There’s no right answer.

Stephanie: How do you work through associating, I’ll use the example of being a wreck after the holiday with it being more than just a food that made you a wreck? Do you know, like people often go to Oh, it’s the high screen. Like it’s just didn’t have the ice cream. I would have been a wreck. Meanwhile, they like their sleep cycle change because they’re on holiday. They walked more if they’re doing tourists. there’s so many other factors that change the food.

Dr. Jillian: Well, yeah, and so, you know, with the three week reset, we’re focused a little bit more on food just because, it’s three weeks and we just got to play with one thing, but I always talk about this in the program, even if it’s a short program, about if we’re, like, hyper fixated on the food, we’re already in the wrong spot.

Dr. Jillian: if your only consideration for how your body feels is what you ate, then you’re getting stuck back in some old diet mentality stuff, because you’re absolutely right. later nights. I mean, I drink way more. I drink way more coffee and alcohol, right? Like sleeping different. having no alone time to recharge.

Stephanie: Uh, simulated all the time with new stuff. And

Dr. Jillian: yeah, yeah, yeah. So remembering always that when it comes to health, when it comes to managing health, even when it comes to managing health conditions, we’re never going to get hyper fixated. On just food and movement or supplements, you know, but sometimes within this world, that’s what I’m working on. But we’re always, of course, considering like there’s a whole, even in the three week reset, there’s a whole lesson on cycles. And like, where are you in the world as you do this reset? What is the season? If you have a cycle, where are you at in your cycle? And how can you stay connected to that, you know, and considerate of it, without feeling like you are a victim to it, to your body and every whim and urge and craving.

Dr. Jillian: So, yeah, to me this is just an evolution. the work that we’ve all been doing, yeah,

Stephanie: but more specifically you because I want to emphasize the fact that we had a DM conversation a few months ago around that, that you’re licensed to practice medicine, you’re not just I’m saying that and I’m a nutritionist, but yeah, I’m a nutritionist, but I’m not licensed to practice medicine.

Stephanie: Hmm. Do you see what I’m saying? there’s a difference because you have different caseload that I have that need a different lens.

Dr. Jillian: that’s it. And so, for me, when I finally stepped out of this was owning the fact that just because this work isn’t right for everyone doesn’t mean it’s not right for or needed by anyone.

Dr. Jillian: Right. And me being able to, that I’m really good at it because I’ve done it for a long time. Now, if someone’s ready for this or not ready for it. You know, like it’s pretty apparent based on even how they talk about what’s happening with them, how they, and I will say, as a naturopath, even throughout all my intuitive eating years, there were definitely people that were coming to me who were further through the spectrum already.

Dr. Jillian: You know, and they were ready for this work, and I just wasn’t ready to give it to them yet. So I mean, you were in your

Stephanie: own

Dr. Jillian: black and white. Yes. Yeah. And I was in my own, everybody’s in diet mentality. And we have to be very afraid if somebody is like, cutting out gluten or whatever it would like it. I was like, I was exercising this muscle of Permission and trying to teach that and again, I’ve just evolved into this space of like, we can be accepting of the bodies that we’re in. We can be accepting of some of the health challenges that we have without being ambivalent. That’s 1 of the biggest things Ellen Satter taught me.

Dr. Jillian: We don’t need to be ambivalent. We can consider what’s happening. So ambivalent is. Ignoring or going unconscious or not caring about it. So, you can accept your body and be like, Okay, this is my body, this is the weight that I’m at. maybe you have diabetes or you have high, what, high blood pressure or you’re going through perimenopause.

Dr. Jillian: I can be accepting of that and I don’t need to fight it. But I don’t need to just ignore it or not care about it either. I can put some intention into taking care of this body that I’m in. And that’s not a negative thing. It’s a great thing. You just want to make sure you know, of course, that you’re led by someone who isn’t going to pull you back into hyper fixating on a single food or whatever

Stephanie: supplement cleanse or I’ll take the most recently I’ve been sharing a lot of story about a knee injury and I’m in, I live in a larger body. So traditional medicine, the first thing they went to is your weight and I had to set my boundaries. So the K team. All of you listen. I’m going to do everything you want me to do except go on a diet and lose weight. So give me a protocol for somebody that is a normal size for a knee injury and I’ll do it all.

Stephanie: Like I won’t just wait for it to be fixed. I will be actively working towards my health. So I have now, six months later, still a regimen of stretching and strengthening and all of that. I’m doing what I need to be doing for the health of my knee, except one thing, which is to lose weight. But that doesn’t mean because I don’t want to lose weight that I don’t do anything. That would be the right thing.

Dr. Jillian: Right. Yeah. Or you don’t care about your knee or you’re just going to ignore it and be like, well. let go and let God or whatever they say, you know, no, you don’t have to do that. Right. And so again, I think my work has focused a little bit more on the food movement side of things because it’s trickier.

Dr. Jillian: Like I felt like for many years I did add ins right. So just like supplements, the things that we can add in. and then again, I just felt like there was just this next little thing that, that there was a group of people who really needed to be able to explore. But you know, again, always within context, like if somebody has, I had lunch with a friend, earlier this week and, she did this whole hypnotherapy program for IBS and like, amazing.

Dr. Jillian: If there’s a way to control IBS without needing to be on a highly restrictive diet, like I’m always looking for multifaceted approaches. And you know, if someone has blood sugar that’s out of control and their doctor saying you’re diabetic or pre diabetic, how’s your sleep? We know that terrible sleep leads to out of control blood sugar, like always, always, always, like I feel obviously like all of this other work that I’ve done for years has landed me in this place where I can have a great perspective while helping people, be a little bit more intentional with their food and movement and supplement protocols. Yeah,

Stephanie: and the intention, like I, like we were saying in the beginning, not being losing weight. But supporting your body more,

Dr. Jillian: that’s it. That’s literally it. It’s like we just take that one thing out of the equation and we learn to manage all of the feelings that pop up that want to pull us back into that and also the feelings that kind of were developed or came about as people learn to say yes to themselves.

Dr. Jillian: Like they had to really sometimes be like, I’m allowed. I deserve it. I’m worth it. But How could we bring those phrases into discernment instead of just yeses? Like you’re allowed. Yes. You’re allowed. Of course. You’re always allowed as an adult. You can do whatever you want to do. What would you like to do?

Dr. Jillian: Right? If we bring the body and the mind back together, what would you like to do? You know, I love caffeine. My body would happily have caffeine all day, every day, but my sleep. is not good. So I make choices around that, right? Sometimes I set a parameter on my caffeine intake. It doesn’t mean it’s always easy because I’m Irish and we want to drink black tea after everything, all hours of the day and night, you know, but it doesn’t serve me.

Dr. Jillian: So I make choices about that. It’s just trickier when it comes to certain foods because the thought processes get messy for people and they need help. Sifting through it,

Stephanie: I think for me, the word you said here is key is the thought process because as you were talking, I often talk about rebellious eating and often the risk, like eating, and you eat whatever emotionally eating and response because you’re angry, but emotional rebellious eating can swing the other way where there’s no more nose.

Stephanie: It’s just yes. Now you’re rebelliously eating. In another way, still the answer is no rebellious eating either way, it’s the middle.

Dr. Jillian: Well, I talk about this all the time because, women will say, if someone even merely suggests that I might need to look at my food, I’m eating it, it’s that, you know, that saying which is like cutting off your own nose to spite your face. And if this food actually makes you feel bad and you’re kind of aware of it, like you’re not rebelling against diet culture at this point. You’re rebelling against yourself. Yes.

Dr. Jillian: Right. And there’s like a level of safety that we need to create or find so that you don’t need to rebel. That you feel safe enough that you can just make choices. Like you’re not constantly worried that someone’s about to crush your safety.

Stephanie: Yeah, you’re rebelling against yourself because you’re being inconsiderate of supporting your body with food with and it’s the same thing. If we were to talk about movement, I mean, yeah, how many women are stuck in the no phase of movement because they use the too much to shrink their body. So now they’re stuck in and I was there for 5 years of not moving your body. And that has side effects.

Dr. Jillian: Yeah. Yeah. It’s we have to get clear on the fact that sometimes there are pros to taking a break from exercise, but there are also side effects to not moving our body.

Dr. Jillian: And it’s not diet culture to be aware of those things and consider them and learn how to work our way through. Right. So, I feel like it’s a really exciting conversation. And like I said, I think that if there’s anyone who listens to this. And it pulls up negative feelings. That’s okay. set the episode aside and get, there’ll be a moment where you’re like ready and then you’re like, what was that? Okay. Who are those two women talking about this thing? Because there are rare cases where I think people are never ready for this. Like maybe there’s just been too much trauma around their body or food or whatever. And that’s fine because the healthiest thing that people can be doing is just getting enough food, like bottom line, you know, eating enough and eating regularly and all of that. So they’re already nine tenths of the way there. This is like the cherry on the icing on the cake. You know what I mean?

Stephanie: how would you to the person listening who’s triggered by this and not ready for this? What would you say is the thing they can do to be ready for that healthiest conversation?

Dr. Jillian: Well, what that always pulls up for me is that they’re feeling pressure. So, something about us talking about this is making them feel pressured to do something. And so, just reminding themselves that they’re not pressured to do anything. They can always make choices. And if this feels like too much pressure, then what I tend to redirect people back toward is like neutralizing their relationship with food, feeding themselves right, just get back into that, like neutralizing their own. moral judgments about food, like there must be some in there for them still.

Dr. Jillian: Because like internalized sexism, internalized misogyny. Like you are now applying it to yourself. I mean, there’s also the possibility that people outside of you are applying it to you. Fine. Fair enough. But often, like if people are in a situation where this is interesting, but oh my God, I can’t.

Dr. Jillian: It’s like, where have you internalized? Stories about your own body, about food, about movement, is there a way for you to start challenging that, creating more and more safety within yourself, knowing that, you know, the outside world is always going to be putting weird pressures on us, awful pressures that we can’t necessarily mitigate, you know.

Dr. Jillian: but I feel like most often when people have that triggered reaction, it’s like we’re finding the wound. That’s what we’re finding. A trigger is the wound. So what healing needs to happen there? What do you need to happen so that you are, because this is interesting actually, because what I would hear from most women is that this quasi eating phase that they would find themselves in still didn’t fully feel like liberation or control or agency.

Dr. Jillian: Right. And so when we find the wound, it’s like, what do we need to heal up so that you can actually reclaim full empowerment, like at first it felt like empowerment and agency to say yes, but then eventually it starts to be like, but if I can’t also say no to something that really doesn’t feel good in my body and affects me negatively.

Dr. Jillian: That doesn’t really feel like freedom either, you know? So what do we need to heal up? that’s the wound. What do we need to heal up? Where do we need to create more safety? Where do you need to feel like you are fully in control of the decisions that you’re making? What thoughts? What behaviors? What understandings? What do we need to shift so that you can trust yourself to make the right choices for you?

Stephanie: What would you say to the person who’s listening to this? Been around intuitive eating for a while perhaps in the journey and she says, oh, that’s the way of doing intuitive eating So I don’t feel out of control

Dr. Jillian: because she’s feeling out of control right now Well, there’s a couple of different ways of looking at that. So the first is the other thing I really learned from Ellen Satter, which I didn’t get, what, because she does competent eating, which is a little different, right? We talked about this from intuitive eating, is that she does always provide some structure for the people that she works with.

Dr. Jillian: And I have found along the way through eating disorder work, as well as just disordered eating work, that there are some people who need some structure right out of the gate. they just cannot, there are some people who need no structure, like even the mere mention of structure. They’ve been, the other analogy I use for this, which might be helpful for your clientele, I’m not sure, is, Barbara Colaroso is a parenting expert, so she writes parenting and, she’d talk about the brick wall parent.

Dr. Jillian: Sometimes, you know, the dictator parent, the brick wall parent, right? They have the rules. They never bend them. They never consider the cut. That’s the dieter, right? The brick wall. That’s the plan. I’m sticking with it. I don’t care if I’m nearly passing out or I have a headache I’m sticking with. Then there’s the jellyfish parent often born from a brick wall parent who has no rules and no parameters and stare as late as you want.

Dr. Jillian: And Children don’t actually feel particularly safe in either of these households, because they don’t feel safe if they’re not heard or considered, and they don’t feel safe, there’s zero structure, and it feels like nobody’s caring for you, it’s like a 24 7 party, that doesn’t feel good to a kid either, and so what we’re trying to do as parents is become these, she calls them backbone parents, where there’s this flexible backbone, where there’s some structureAnd this is the analogy I use as well, like sometimes when we leave dieting, we become jellyfish and we’ve got to come back to this.

Dr. Jillian: So I’d say, actually you could experiment with it, but if it makes things worse, you’re doing it for the wrong reasons.

Stephanie: I’ll say this, meet the gray space, you have to have gone to the black and white space. Yeah, like to be able to be flexible, you have to know both and say, I don’t want this and I don’t want this.

Stephanie: And I want something here in the middle, but completely avoiding this, you’re missing out building safety for being in all part of life.

Dr. Jillian: I’m thinking about I’m seeing like. big splotches of paint, right? And you can’t make gray if you haven’t dipped your hand into the black and into the white. So, right. So yeah, like I’ll say yes and no’s are flip sides of the same coin.

Dr. Jillian: So if you can’t own a yes, you cannot properly own a no. they’re limited by the extent to which you can explore each one of those things. So I would agree with you. I love this, like taking these splotches of color. If you want to create gray, you know, you can’t just have been a dieter who’s been really reacting negatively to dieting and then think all of a sudden you can just be in gray.

Stephanie: You know? You have to have both. Yeah. And the exploration is born out of safety. For you to be able to explore the both side, you need to be able to have the safety within yourself from yourself to yourself and that’s built. By trusting yourself through every phase of eating. I love that. Is there anything else you would like people to know about Healthish? And where can they find out more about Healthish with you?

Dr. Jillian: Well, the link that I’ve given you is healthishnewsletter. com. And there’s like a two week series, which is kind of fun. Because some of it may be familiar. It’s it’s like breaking down sayings that I hate in the wellness culture, but it’s fun because some of them are really diety and some of them are not.

Dr. Jillian: Some of them are kind of anti diety and I’m like, well, let’s look at what I don’t love about this either, you know? so that’s a really great way to get introduced to the concept and to me and to find out more about this work. I don’t know if there’s anything else I want people to know, but just that.

Dr. Jillian: You have your podcast. Oh, yes. I have a podcast. Yeah. It’s 100 percent healthy. It used to be food, freedom, body love, but it’s 100 percent healthy ish. And Stephanie, you’re going to come be on as well in a couple of weeks. and there’s all kinds of great conversations there as well. as I’ve moved from where I was into this, I think there’s lots of interesting conversations around reintegrating wellness.

Dr. Jillian: In a less toxic way because there’s good stuff in there if we come at it with a really good critical thinking mind and we’re clear on what we value and how we want to feel in our bodies. There’s so much goodness in there.

Stephanie: Anybody that’s listening to this that have a medicalized condition or diagnosed condition, I will just say you can work with them. And often people from my world are not equipped for that. They need to refer out. So yeah, you’re the resource within intuitive eating health at every size for people with conditions.

Dr. Jillian: Yeah. Hello at healthyish. ca. there’s a dash healthy ish. ca. You can email me. Yes, we can work with it.

Stephanie: Yeah, and that’s the conversation we had on DM, like if I had the need for a health condition, you’d be the first person I would go to because I would know you have all these principles in this baseline. I wouldn’t be served what I don’t need to be served.

Dr. Jillian: No, you don’t need to be super restrictive to manage diabetes. You don’t need to be super restrictive to manage high cholesterol. that is not true. It backfires. It’s bad. But we can be intentional and thoughtful at the same time.

Stephanie: Yeah. Yeah. That was a beautiful conversation. I’m happy we had it. And I love to be able to introduce people to my listener who have a great view. It’s not dichotomy on the one side to the other is disability to be in the middle safely.

Dr. Jillian: Thank you. I love it. Thanks for having me.

 

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Podcast Stephanie Dodier

Welcome!

I’m Stephanie Dodier

Feminist Nutritionist & Coach.

I guide women on how to feel damn good  by reshaping their mind instead of their body. Let’s go beyond the food and fight diet culture & patriarchy by living powerfully. You’ll walk away with ressources to embrace your well-being & health in a way that will expand your freedom and power.

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